Samuel Sewall1

M, b. 26 May 1847, d. 3 February 1900
     Samuel Sewall was born on 26 May 1847 in Massachusetts.1 He was the son of Samuel Sewall and Tryphosa Fuller.1 Samuel Sewall married Hannah Catherine "Kittie" Marden, daughter of Benjamin Franklin Marden and Betsey Buss, on 27 November 1873 in Fairmount Street, Lowell, Massachusetts.2 Samuel Sewall died on 3 February 1900 at the age of 52.1

Children of Samuel Sewall and Hannah Catherine "Kittie" Marden

Citations

  1. [S153] Charles Nelson Sinnett, Sinnett's Sewall genealogy, p. 47.
  2. [S205] Newspaper, Lowell Daily Citizen and News, (Lowell, MA) Friday, November 28, 1873.

Samuel Sewall1

M, b. 25 January 1853, d. 21 January 1854
     Samuel Sewall was born on 25 January 1853.1 He was the son of Henry Foster Sewall and Sarah Allyne Rich.1 Samuel Sewall died on 21 January 1854.1

Citations

  1. [S153] Charles Nelson Sinnett, Sinnett's Sewall genealogy, p.10.

Samuel Sewall1

M, b. 3 December 1827, d. 23 June 1893
     Samuel Sewall. Shoemaker.2 He was born on 3 December 1827 in Phippsburg, Maine, (calculated from his age at death.)2 He was the son of Samuel Sewall and Harriet Drummond.1 Samuel Sewall died on 23 June 1893 in Bath, Maine, at the age of 65 of disease of the heart.2

Citations

  1. [S233] Josiah H. Drummond, The descendants of Alexander Drummond, p. 40.
  2. [S232] Ancestry.com, Maine Death Records, 1617-1922.

Samuel Sewall1

M, b. circa 1794, d. 15 January 1871
     Samuel Sewall was born circa 1794.1 He was the son of Thomas Sewall and Sarah Weeks.1 Samuel Sewall married Betsey Whitney on 31 December 1818 in Canterbury, New Hampshire.2 Samuel Sewall died on 15 January 1871 in Northfield, New Hampshire.2

Children of Samuel Sewall and Betsey Whitney

Citations

  1. [S365] Eben Graves, The descendants of Henry Sewall. Vol. II (Unpublished), p. 311.
  2. [S364] Eben Graves, The descendants of Henry Sewall. Vol. II (Unpublished), #214.
  3. [S364] Eben Graves, The descendants of Henry Sewall. Vol. II (Unpublished), #378.
  4. [S364] Eben Graves, The descendants of Henry Sewall. Vol. II (Unpublished), #379.
  5. [S364] Eben Graves, The descendants of Henry Sewall. Vol. II (Unpublished), #380.
  6. [S364] Eben Graves, The descendants of Henry Sewall. Vol. II (Unpublished), #382.

Capt. Samuel Sewall

M, b. 9 April 1688, d. 28 April 1769
     Capt. Samuel Sewall was born on 9 April 1688 in Newbury, Massachusetts.1,2,3 He was the son of John Sewall and Hannah Fessenden. In about 1708 he, together with his brother Nicholas, settled in York, Maine, where his sister was then living.2,4 Capt. Samuel Sewall married first Lydia Storer, daughter of Capt. Samuel Storer and Lydia Austin.2 Capt. Samuel Sewall then married Sarah Batchelder, daughter of John Batchelder and Sarah Poore, on 29 November 1723 at Newbury.3 Capt. Samuel Sewall died on 28 April 1769 in York, Maine, at the age of 81 "leaving seven sons and four daughters."5,6 The inscription on a stone in the old burying ground in York reads " In memory of Samuel Sewall, Esq., four generations in a lineal descent from Henry Sewall, Esq. sometime Mayor of Coventry in O. England, whose grandfather Henry first came to N. England, 1634. For penetration, sound judgment, and wisdom, remarkable; given to hospitality; the widow and fatherless he relieved and protected; various offices, civil, military and ecclesiastical, with honor and reputation he sustained; pious, exemplary and devout, on the 28th of April, 1769, aged LXXXI, he died. His seven surviving sons, with the approbation of his four daughters, this stone erected. "Let brotherly love continue."5 "

Children of Capt. Samuel Sewall and Lydia Storer

Children of Capt. Samuel Sewall and Sarah Batchelder

Citations

  1. [S25] Samuel Sewall, Diary of Samuel Sewall (1973 ed.), p. 1079.
  2. [S62] William Richard Cutter, New England Families.
  3. [S130] Massachusetts Vital Records.
  4. [S83] NEHGR, Vol. 113, p. 195.
  5. [S83] NEHGR, Vol. 9, p. 343.
  6. [S124] Samuel (Rev.) Sewall, Pedigree of Sewall.
  7. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.

Major Samuel Sewall1,2

M, b. 24 November 1689, d. 5 May 1757
     Major Samuel Sewall was baptised on 24 November 1689 by Mr. Higgins of Boston.3 He was born on 24 November 1689.3 He was the son of Major Stephen Sewall and Margaret Mitchell. He was a a ship-chandler of Boston. 1720 Artillery Company; 1734 Captain, Artillery Company; 1733 Major in the Boston regiment. Active in town affairs and served on important committees.4,5 Major Samuel Sewall married Catherine George, daughter of John George and Lydia Lee, on 1 January 1716/17 the marriage being conducted by Dr. Cotton. The bride's name is spelt How in the record.4 Major Samuel Sewall made a will on 11 January 1753.5 He died on 5 May 1757 in Boston, Massachusetts, at the age of 67 s.n.p. his two step-sons having drowned in 1727/28.4,5 Probate was granted on 6 May 1757 his wife Katherine was executor. Legatees: to my brother and sister, Stephen Sewall, and Mehetable Robie, and to my wife Katherine, all the rest of my estate.5

Citations

  1. [S2] Ancestor of J.E. McClellan, McClellan Family Tree.
  2. [S83] NEHGR, Vol. 1 p. 191.
  3. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.
  4. [S25] Samuel Sewall, Diary of Samuel Sewall (1973 ed.), p. 1080.
  5. [S102] Annie Haven Thwing, Inhabitants of the Town of Boston, 54165.

Major Samuel Sewall

M, b. 14 September 1724, d. 23 July 1815
     Major Samuel Sewall was born on 14 September 1724 in York, Maine, or 24 Sep. 1724 (Sinnett gives 24 October 1724.)1,2,3,4 He was the son of Capt. Samuel Sewall and Sarah Batchelder. Major Samuel Sewall died on 23 July 1815 in York, Maine, at the age of 90 he was unmarried.1,5 An inscription on a stone in the old burying ground in York, on the west side of York River reads "In memory of Maj. Samuel Sewall, an architect of the first class, from whose fabrications great benefit has resulted to society. He was benevolent, hospitable and generous without ostentation and pious without enthusiasm. He died July 28, 1815, ae. 91."6

Little is known about the enigmatic "jack-of-all trades" Samuel Sewall, who built everything from coffins to cradles in town in the late 1700s, but local history buffs are slowly unraveling the mystery. Locals, historians, and even some of Sewall’s descendants packed into the York Public Library’s meeting room last week to hear Old York Historical Society’s curator Tom Johnson present these findings in a brown bag lecture called "Samuel Sewall: The Man and His Work."

Sewall was born in York in 1724 to a father of the same name and his mother, Sarah Bachellor Titcomb. He died on July 23, 1815, at the age of 91, and was buried in his family’s plot on Southside Road, near the Elizabeth Perkins House, one of the many structures in town to which his craftsmanship has been attributed. The Sewall House, which is thought to be his house, is across the street, facing Seabury Road, on Sewall’s Hill. Other structures he built or furnished between the 1740s and 1780s include the First Parish Church, on York Street; the Moulton-Bennett House, on York Street; the Ramsdell House, on Lindsay Road; and the Grow-Steedman House, on Clark Lane. However, said Johnson, the edifice that was truly the "Rosetta Stone" for the identification of Sewall’s work was the Sayward-Wheeler House, on Route 103, which was named after its owner, the wealthiest merchant in town at the time, Jonathan Sayward.

"The talents of Samuel Sewall were rediscovered by scholarly researchers in 1977, when Myrna Kaye and Brock Jobe, of the Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities, identified him as one of the workers on Jonathan Sayward’s house in York Harbor," said Johnson. A Sayward diary entry dated Nov. 10, 1761, notes paying "Samuel Sewell the joiner 45 pounds old tenor toward work on my house," and led to inquiries of molding profiles within the home, which linked Sewall to similar crafts in town. "These molding profiles, in turn, were found to be identical in profile to moldings on a number of furniture pieces in the house," said Johnson. "Thus, for the first time since the 18th century, bridging Sewall with his cabinetwork." Johnson said the most interesting piece found in the Sayward-Wheeler House is a high chest, which has a number of moldings crafted from the same planes in the parlor. To add to the uniqueness of each of Sewall’s projects, he made his own tools and templates, making many of the cuts and curves in local wooden antiques identifiable with his name. "From this first identification has resulted the credible attribution to over 50 known pieces of furniture to Sewall, ranging from sophisticated highboys ... to relatively simple drop leaf tables," added Johnson.

Distinctive corner cupboards, or beaufats, as they were called in the 18th century, are thought to be one of Sewall’s "hallmarks", said Johnson, along with his pilasters with fluting and stop-fluting, pegged drawer bottoms, massive back base brackets, and "horse bone" legs. At a local auction two years ago, Johnson uncovered what may have been his most exciting discovery yet. On the side of the bottom drawer of a Northeast Chest, made of unfigured maple and the familiar top and bracket cut-outs, was a color card of stain finishes used by Sewall. "Every known piece of Sewall furniture, with an original finish I’ve looked at since we found this, have matched one of these colors," he said. These designs are beacons signaling Sewall’s work, but some furniture that has been uncovered reveals only hints of these schemes, leading Johnson and others to believe that they were cut and fashioned by a different hand.

While doing some research on Sewall’s genealogy, Johnson came across an unattributed file stating that his father Samuel Sewall Sr., "had been trained as a furniture maker in Boston." From this, historians now conclude that Sewall learned much of his skill from his father, and that some of the pieces found, which do not exactly match the son’s craftsmanship, may be the work of an older Sewall. "Samuel the younger would have naturally picked up a number of his father’s framing and finishing methods, but with maturation, might have changed some of them to suit his needs and skill," said Johnson. It’s difficult to draw these conclusions, however, because little of Sewall’s physical evidence exists, and few of his personal belongings have been uncovered.

Local private collections include two of his needlework wallets embroidered with his name, pewter plates associated with his ownership and use, and an original survey transit made by him. The tripod to the transit was given to OYHS a year after the Old Gaol Museum first opened in 1900, and the group also has an English gold-cased watch, and a sabre sword which was presented to Sewall by the local militia for his services during the War of 1812, when he was in his late 80s. These artifacts, and others, are currently on display downstairs at the York Public Library.

Of course, Sewall wasn’t known only for his woodworking expertise, he was also celebrated for his engineering work on Sewall’s Bridge, which still spans the York River today. "It was the first pile-driven drawbridge built and engineered in America, in 1761," said Johnson. "This didn’t happen in the leading metropolitan areas of engineering and scientific thinking, such as Boston, New York, or Philadelphia, but it was here in York. In fact, the Boston engineers were so impressed by the design that they brought Sewall to the growing city and had him build a near-duplicate of the structure over the Charles River in 1785-86." Records show that the design influenced similar bridges in New England, and even one in Paris, France. Though the bridge has been reconstructed several times since its creation, five original pieces from the structure are now housed at the OYHS, and many other residents have obtained the relics as well.

Sewall never married, leaving no known descendants that any historian knows of, but as Johnson said, "his brothers and uncles raised large families and the name lives on in town."

by Marci Hait
mhait@seacoastonline.com
The York Weekly, March 3 2004.

Citations

  1. [S25] Samuel Sewall, Diary of Samuel Sewall (1973 ed.), p. 1079.
  2. [S83] NEHGR, Vol. 66 p. 86.
  3. [S83] NEHGR, Vol. 113, p. 196 Vital Records of York, Maine.
  4. [S153] Charles Nelson Sinnett, Sinnett's Sewall genealogy, p.15.
  5. [S83] NEHGR, Vol. 113 p. 196. Vital Records of York, Maine.
  6. [S83] NEHGR, Vol. 9, p. 343.

Rev. Samuel Sewall

M, b. 1 June 1785, d. 18 February 1868
Rev. Samuel Sewall
(1785-1868)
     Rev. Samuel Sewall was born on 1 June 1785 in Marblehead, Essex County, Massachusetts.1,2,3 He was the son of Chief Justice Samuel Sewall LL.D. and Abigail Devereaux. He graduated from Harvard in the class of 1804 and went on to study divinity. He was ordained Deacon in the Episcopal Church at New York, and officiated there for about a year. He renounced his connection with that church, and was subsequently ordained pastor of the Congregational Church in Burlington, Mass., April 13th, 1814. Dr. Henry Ware, Senior, preached the sermon; Rev. Dr. Holmes, of Cambridge, made the ordaining prayer, and Rev. President Kirkland gave the charge to the pastor. That was just previous to the separation of the Trinitarian ministers and churches in the commonwealth of Massachusetts from the Unitarian; and it may be proper to mention a fact, which occurred at Mr. Sewall's ordination, as it illustrates the manners and customs of that day. The council adopted the rule, that, in the examination of the candidate, each member of the council might ask the candidate three questions, provided they were approved by the council. The Rev. Samuel Stearns, of Bedford, who was one of the few Orthodox members of the council, inquired if he might ask the candidate this question: "Do you believe that the punishment of the wicked in the future world will continue as long as the happiness of the righteous ? " And the council decided, that it was a question which was not proper to be put! Mr. Sewall left the Episcopal Church because he could not adhere to the Thirty Nine Articles, and when he was ordained at Burlington his theological views were indefinite and undetermined, but during the latter half of his ministry he became decidedly evangelical, and he always had a large share of that charity for others which "hopeth all things."

It is an interesting fact, that Mr. Sewall lived and died in the parsonage which had been occupied as such by his two predecessors, the Rev. Thomas Jones and the Rev. John Marrett, and the entire ministry of these three men covered a, period of more than 107 years. It is another interesting fact, that Mr. Marrett married the daughter of his predecessor, Mr. Jones, and that Mr. Sewall married the daughter of his predecessor, Mr. Marrett. Another coincidence is that Mr. Marrett died on the same month and the same day of the month as Father Sewall, namely, 18th February 1813. Mr. Sewall was pastor of the church in Burlington for twenty-eight years. He was dismissed from his pastoral charge in 1842. Since that time be supplied the church in North Woburn for a further six years. He preached his last sermon in Carlisle, 11th August 1867, and performed his last public service on 19th December 1867, at the ordination of his successor in Burlington, Rev. Mr. Hudson, when he offered the ordaining prayer.

Father Sewall, as he has for many years been deferentially called, was a gentleman of the old school, of affable and accomplished manners, and was one of the few remaining links which connected the active habits of the present generation with the quiet habits of the past. He was a man of great conscientiousness, and of remarkably consistent deportment. He was distinguished as a scholar, especially in the ecclesiastical history of New-England, and his judgment upon any point in the polity of the Congregational churches was entitled to great respect. He prepared and published in the American Quarterly Register for 1839, 1840, and 1841, several articles relating to the ministers and churches in the county of Middlesex, which indicate great breadth of research and accuracy of statement. But the most elaborate literary work of his life is his History of Woburn, which he lived to complete, but did not live to see published. It will long remain a monument of indefatigable labour, and may be depended on for its correctness. Sewall was one of the earliest members of the New England Historic-Genealogical Society having been elected 12th June 1845.4

Rev. Samuel Sewall married Martha Margaret Marrett, daughter of Rev. John Marrett and Martha Jones, on 1 January 1818 in Burlington, Massachusetts.5 Rev. Samuel Sewall died on 18 February 1868 of old age in Burlington, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, at the age of 82.6,7,3

Children of Rev. Samuel Sewall and Martha Margaret Marrett

Citations

  1. [S83] NEHGR, Vol. 23 p. 86 Necrology of New England Colleges.
  2. [S130] Massachusetts Vital Records, Vital Records of Burlington, Massachusetts to the Year 1850.
  3. [S461] Samuel Sewall, The History of Woburn, p. i.
  4. [S83] NEHGR, Vol. 23 p. 215.
  5. [S130] Massachusetts Vital Records, Vital Records of Woburn, MA.
  6. [S83] NEHGR, Vol. 23 p. 86 Necrology of New England Colleges.
  7. [S130] Massachusetts Vital Records, Vol: 212 ; Page: 91.
  8. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.
  9. [S87] Kate Hogenson, Communication from K. Hogenson, Descendants of Charles Chauncy Sewall @ Jan 2005.

Rev. Samuel Sewall1

M, b. 21 December 1764, d. 16 March 1826
     Rev. Samuel Sewall was born on 21 December 1764 in Arrowsic Island, Maine.2 He was the son of Henry Sewall and Mary Stinson.1 Rev. Samuel Sewall married Abigail Trask, daughter of Thomas Trask, on 4 January 1787 in Bath, Sagadahoc, Maine.3 Rev. Samuel Sewall died on 16 March 1826 in Rye, New Hampshire, at the age of 61 whence he had gone from the Isle of Shoals where he had been preaching.4,5 He was buried in Rye Center Cemetery.

He was apprenticed to a tanner and followed that trade from the time he was twelve years old until he was eighteen. He then lived in Bath, Maine, until he was twenty. After clearing a farm on Sandy River he married and the couple's home was between Farmington and Chesterville, Maine, in the wilderness. He was a millwright. In 1796 he became interested in the ministry and held meetings in Farmington in 1800. He was licensed to preach in Lincoln, Maine, as a Congregational minister, and in 1805 he moved to Edgemont, being ordained pastor there in 1807. (Edgecomb and a date of 30 September, according to Jotham p. 168). He moved to Phippsburg, Maine, in 1814, and in 1824 was the first missionary to the Isle of Shoals.6,7

Children of Rev. Samuel Sewall and Abigail Trask

Citations

  1. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.
  2. [S232] Ancestry.com, Maine, Death Records, 1761-1922 for Stinson Sewall.
  3. [S89] Family Search, Vital records, 1779-1903 Bath (Maine).
  4. [S22] Rev. Jotham Sewall, A memoir of Rev. Jotham Sewall of Chesterville, Maine., p. 281.
  5. [S205] Newspaper, New-Hampshire Statesman and Concord Register, (Concord, NH) Saturday, March 25, 1826.
  6. [S62] William Richard Cutter, New England Families.
  7. [S22] Rev. Jotham Sewall, A memoir of Rev. Jotham Sewall of Chesterville, Maine., p. 168.

Samuel Addison Sewall

M, b. 16 June 1926, d. 10 January 1990
     Samuel Addison Sewall was born on 16 June 1926 in Floral Park, New York.1,2 He was the son of Samuel Donnell Sewall and Gladys Edith Labdon.1 Samuel Addison Sewall married Eleanor Corrine Kinnaman, daughter of Joseph H. Kinnaman and Eleanor F. Kirkendale, on 17 June 1950 in Stewart Manor, Nassau County, New York.3 Samuel Addison Sewall died on 10 January 1990 in Greenville, Pitt, North Carolina, at the age of 632 and is buried in Greenwood Cemetery, Greenville, Pitt County, North Carolina.4

Citations

  1. [S231] 1930 US Census, Floral Park, Nassau, New York.
  2. [S89] Family Search, North Carolina Deaths, 1931-1994.
  3. [S205] Newspaper, Nassau Daily Review-Star, 19 June 1950.
  4. [S392] Website findagrave.com (http://www.findagrave.com/) "# 87445382; # 87445474."

Samuel Bailey Sewall1

M, b. 30 October 1855, d. 15 February 1923
     Samuel Bailey Sewall was born on 30 October 1855 in Mobile, Alabama.1,2 He was the son of Kiah Bayley Sewall and Lucretia Day.1 Samuel Bailey Sewall was living at Philadelphia in 1910. He died on 15 February 1923 at the age of 673 and is buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Portland, Maine.3

Citations

  1. [S153] Charles Nelson Sinnett, Sinnett's Sewall genealogy, p. 56.
  2. [S107] 1880 US Census.
  3. [S392] Website findagrave.com (http://www.findagrave.com/) "# 119036428."

Samuel Billington Sewall1

M, b. 7 January 1992, d. 20 August 2000
     Samuel Billington Sewall was born on 7 January 1992 in Ramsey County, Minnesota.2 He died on 20 August 2000 in Ramsey County, Minnesota, at the age of 8.3

Citations

  1. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.
  2. [S232] Ancestry.com, Minnesota Birth Index, 1935-2002.
  3. [S232] Ancestry.com, Minnesota Death Index, 1908-2002.

Samuel Brown Sewall1

M, b. 17 August 1846, d. 5 July 1883
     Samuel Brown Sewall was born on 17 August 1846 in Burlington, Massachusetts.2,3 He was the son of Samuel Sewall and Elizabeth H. Brown.1 Samuel Brown Sewall married Louisa Elizabeth Farrington, daughter of Thomas F. Farrington and Hannah L. Dodge, on 11 June 1872 in Cambridgeport, Massachusetts, the marriage was performed by the Rev. Charles C. Sewall.4,5 Samuel Brown Sewall died on 5 July 1883 in Cambridge, Massachusetts, at the age of 36.6

He was first a clerk at Carter & Wiley's, druggists of Washington Street, Boston but then went into business on his own account as a druggist and apothecary on Main Street, corner of Oak, Charlestown, Massachusetts.3

Children of Samuel Brown Sewall and Louisa Elizabeth Farrington

Citations

  1. [S87] Kate Hogenson, Communication from K. Hogenson, Descendants of Charles Chauncy Sewall @ Jan 2005.
  2. [S130] Massachusetts Vital Records, Vital Records of Burlington, Massachusetts to the Year 1850.
  3. [S357] Samuel Dunster, Henry Dunster and His Descendants, p. 98.
  4. [S130] Massachusetts Vital Records, Vol: 245 ; Page: 134.
  5. [S205] Newspaper, Boston Daily Advertiser, (Boston, MA) Wednesday, June 12, 1872.
  6. [S364] Eben Graves, The descendants of Henry Sewall. Vol. II (Unpublished), #449.
  7. [S232] Ancestry.com, U.S. World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942.
  8. [S232] Ancestry.com, Massachusetts, Birth Records, 1840-1915.
  9. [S89] Family Search, California Death Index, 1940-1997.

Samuel Dartmouth Sewall1

M, b. 26 October 1876, d. 12 October 1951
     Samuel Dartmouth Sewall was born on 26 October 1876 in Laporte, Iowa.2 He was the son of William Alfred Sewall and Nellie Josephine Finch.1 Samuel Dartmouth Sewall married Clara Elizabeth Young, daughter of Frank Young and Elizabeth Foster, on 30 March 1910 in British Columbia.1 Samuel Dartmouth Sewall died on 12 October 1951 in East Coulee, Alberta, at the age of 743 and is buried in Burnsland Cemetery, Calgary, Alberta.4

Citations

  1. [S89] Family Search, British Columbia Marriage Registrations, 1859-1932.
  2. [S232] Ancestry.com, U.S., World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918.
  3. [S232] Ancestry.com, Reports of Deaths of American Citizens Abroad, 1835-1974.
  4. [S392] Website findagrave.com (http://www.findagrave.com/) "# 135987255."

Samuel David Sewall

M, b. 6 December 1916, d. 1 January 2011
     Samuel David Sewall was born on 6 December 1916 in Island Falls, Maine.1,2,3 He was the son of Merrill Sewall and Myrtle Gertrude Trafton.1 Samuel David Sewall married Audrey Ruby Ostrander on 20 September 1941 in Raymond, Rockingham County, New Hampshire.4 Samuel David Sewall died on 1 January 2011 in Vero Beach, Florida, at the age of 94.4

Samuel D. Sewall, 94
ISLAND FALLS, ME -- Samuel D. Sewall, 94, passed away Jan.1, 2011 in Vero Beach, Fla. surrounded in love by family to be with his Heavenly Father and the dear ones who passed before him. Sam was born in 1916 in Island Falls, ME in a home built on honor by his grandfather, 'Bill' Sewall, in the 1860s for his wife Mary Sherman Sewall. The second son of Merrill and Myrtle T. Sewall, Sam learned many of life's most valuable lessons at the knees of his father and grandfather.
Sam graduated from Island Falls High School, declining the honor of valedictorian because he disliked public speaking. Years later he gave a wonderful speech of sponsorship for his grandson, Eagle Scout Timothy Kennett.
A true outdoorsman, he was a registered Maine Guide at age 12 and bagged his first deer that same year. His first real paying job at 15 was canoeing dynamite up the West Branch of the Penobscot to Mt. Katahdin. Much of his time was spent helping the family run sporting camps on Mattawamkeag Lake, where years earlier men like Theodore Roosevelt came to learn from Sam's father and grandfather, Bill. It was a much simpler way of life then with the woods, water and field providing sustenance and a strong work ethic that was passed down from earlier generations. During WWII, Sam and his brother Gene moved to the southern part of Maine--Gene enlisted in the Air Force and Sam worked in the Saco-Lowell foundry--work of such excellence that he was deferred from military service. During the war years Sam earned his pilot's license along with his cousins Wingate and Emlen. During this time Sam often traveled to spend weekends in Warner, N.H. and while attending church in Raymond, N.H., he saw a pretty girl singing in the choir, his beloved Audrey. Sam got along famously with Ruth Carver, and often saying a man should find a mother-in-law that he liked and then marry one of her daughters. Sam went on to marry Ruth's only daughter. In September of 1940, set in a beautiful backdrop of pines and white glads, they embarked on the first of 55+ years together. Many years later, Sam faithfully cared for Audrey during her long descent into Alzheimer's disease. Two daughters and six years after they married, doctors told Sam his lungs were filled with iron dust and he should get out of the foundry, he packed his small family and moved back to Hook Point on Mattawamkeag Lake. His parents were struggling to run sporting camps and a boys' camp at that time. For the two years prior to 1949, Sam and his family lived quite self sufficiently taking care to be good stewards of the environment as best they knew how. After moving to town, Sam worked for many years as a carpenter building homes, crafting beauti ful furniture, using whatever was at hand to repurpose materials rather than discard them. He was also the go-to-guy for anything mechanical, electrical or constructional. No wonder that, as he worked for and with Wilson and Mary Palmer at the Island Falls Hardware store, he'd found his niche. Whatever he did, he gave 110% effort, never expecting a thing in return. He was a truly generous soul who would give you the shirt off his back if he thought you were in need. Donna, the daughter of his cousin Harriett said of him, 'He was the kindest, smartest, man, always eager to learn new ways, curious about life, totally self sufficient as many Mainers, who know how it is to do with, and have little, are.' And a friend Chip said of him, your father was one in a million, a true friend and caring person, and everyone was equal.
Sam loved the outdoors and Mattawamkeag Lake, hunting, fishing and gardening, but most of all he loved his family. He was an enthusiast of four wheeling, snowmobiling, reflector oven biscuits, beanpole beans, homemade ice cream, pies and pastries. He will long be remembered for his kindness to children, great sense of humor, the telling of wonderful stories and poetry. He will also be remembered for his truly indomitable spirit and love of his fellow man.
Sam was a third degree mason and served 30+ years as a volunteer fireman, and eventually becoming fire chief. He was also a valued member of the Whitttier Congregational Church, where he served as deacon, summer chocolate ice cream maker, and Lenten breakfast bacon cooker.
He is survived by two daughters, Gail and John Kennett of Scarborough, Cheryl and Peter Connelly of Carthage, Mo; grandchildren, John Kennett and wife Mairi, Allison Conti and husband Adam, all of Scarborough, Jamie Connelly of Fort Worth, Texas and Peter Connelly of Ghent, Belgium; great grandchildren, Nicholas and Patrick Kennett of Scarborough, Marie and Francis Connelly of Ghent, Belgium; his niece, Nancy R. Stacey of Lantana, Fla; as well as many dear cousins, friends and family. He was predeceased by his parents and beloved wife, Audrey; grandson, Timothy D. Kennett; brothers William and Eugene Sewall; and nephew David Sewall.
A graveside memorial service will be held in August at the Island Falls Cemetery. Portland Press Herald/Maine Sunday Telegram, January 30, 2011.4

Citations

  1. [S206] 1920 US Census.
  2. [S205] Newspaper, Portland Press Herald/Maine Sunday Telegram, January 4, 2011.
  3. [S210] Social Security Death Index.
  4. [S205] Newspaper, Portland Press Herald/Maine Sunday Telegram, January 30, 2011.

Samuel Donnell Sewall1

M, b. 20 January 1900, d. 19 July 1979
     Samuel Donnell Sewall was born on 20 January 1900 in Denver, Colorado.1 He was the son of Stephen A. Sewall and Nathalia (Nettie) Flint.2 Samuel Donnell Sewall married Gladys Edith Labdon, daughter of Oswald W. Labdon and Florence J. Arnold.3 Samuel Donnell Sewall died on 19 July 1979 in Prospect Harbor, Hancock County, Maine, at the age of 79.4,5

Children of Samuel Donnell Sewall and Gladys Edith Labdon

Citations

  1. [S34] Unverified internet information, http://accipiter.state.co.us/archive/publicrecordselect
  2. [S207] 1910 US Census, Ward 13, Denver, Colorado.
  3. [S392] Website findagrave.com (http://www.findagrave.com/) "# 117456607."
  4. [S232] Ancestry.com, Maine Death Index, 1960-1997.
  5. [S205] Newspaper, Bangor Daily News, Jul 20, 1979.
  6. [S231] 1930 US Census, Floral Park, Nassau, New York.

Chief Justice Samuel E. Sewall1

M, b. 28 March 1652, d. 1 January 1729/30
Judge Sewall
     Chief Justice Samuel E. Sewall was born on 28 March 1652 in Bishopstoke, Hampshire, England, and despite his writing "I was born at Bishop Stoke, March 28, 1652; so that the Light of the Lord's Day was the first light that my Eyes saw, being born a little before Day-Break" his birth place has been variously recorded as Horton, four miles from Basingstoke - Sibley Vol. 2, p.345; or North Baddesley in Hampshire - Duff p. 26.2,3 He was the son of Rev. Henry Sewall and Jane Dummer. Chief Justice Samuel E. Sewall was baptised on 4 May 1652 at Stoke Church by Thomas Rashley. He emigrated on 6 July 1661 to New England taking passage on the Prudent Mary.4 He graduated in 1671 from Harvard A.B. He was given his degree by Mr. Charles Chauncey who had admitted him in 1667. he graduated A.M. in 1674.5 He married firstly Hannah Hull, daughter of John Hull and Judith Quincy, on 28 February 1675/76 at Boston the ceremony was performed by Governor Bradstreet. It is said that she bought a vast dowry of £30,000 in New England silver shillings, being her own weight in silver.6,7,8 He was a a bookseller merchant and a judge in colonial Massachusetts. His home was at Washington Street east side, just south of Summer Street, Boston in the house of his father-in-law Hull.9

In 1692 the first of Samuel Sewall's many appointments was that of special commissioner to the Court of Oyer and Terminer presiding over the Salem witchcraft trials. He and the other members of this commission were responsible for convicting and sentencing nineteen people to death. The Court, due to its hysterical tenor, inevitably lost its public support and was dismissed. The Superior Court of Judicature was established soon after the close of the Court of Oyer and Terminer and consisted of several of the judges from that court, including Sewall. He was the only commissioner to admit his error publicly.10 In 1697 in church before the congregation he publicly confessed his error in concurring with the death sentences imposed at the Salem Witch Trials. Between 1718 and 1728 he was Chief Justice of the superior court.

Chief Justice Samuel E. Sewall married secondly Abigail Melyen, daughter of Jacob Melyen and Hannah Hubbard, on 29 October 1719 at Boston, Massachusetts, at which ceremony his son Joseph officiated.11 Chief Justice Samuel E. Sewall married thirdly Mary Shrimpton, daughter of Jonathan Shrimpton and Mary Oliver, on 29 March 1722 at Boston, Massachusetts, the service being conducted by his son-in-law, the Rev. William Cooper who is described as a Presbyterian. (A transcription of the Boston Marriages gives a date of 10 March 1722.)12,9,11 Chief Justice Samuel E. Sewall died on 1 January 1729/30 in Boston, Massachusetts, at the age of 77 after an illness lasting about a month.5,13 He was buried in the burying ground of the First Parish Church, Newbury, Massachusetts, the resting place is marked by an old stone, erected by their eldest son, Samuel Sewell, which bears the following inscription:      HENRY SEWELL SENT BY HENRY SEWELL HIS FATHER / IN THE SHIP ELIZABETH AND DORCAS, CAPT. WATT / COMMANDER / ARRIVED AT BOSTON 1634 / WINTERED AT IPSWICH, HELPED BEGIN THIS PLANTATION / 1635, FURNISHING ENGLISH SERVANTS, CATTLE AND PROVISIONS / MARRIED MISTRESS JANE DUMMER, MARCH 26, 1646 / DIED MAY 16. 1700 AETATIS 86. / HIS FRUITFUL VINE BEING THUS DISJOINED / FELL TO THE GROUND JANUARY 13 FOLLOWING, AETATIS 74. / Psalm 27. 10 /.14     

Children of Chief Justice Samuel E. Sewall and Hannah Hull

Citations

  1. [S3] Nina Moore Tiffany, Samuel E. Sewell: a memoir.
  2. [S25] Samuel Sewall, Diary of Samuel Sewall (1973 ed.), p. xxx.
  3. [S130] Massachusetts Vital Records.
  4. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.
  5. [S25] Samuel Sewall, Diary of Samuel Sewall (1973 ed.), p. 1076.
  6. [S3] Nina Moore Tiffany, Samuel E. Sewell: a memoir, p.2.
  7. [S25] Samuel Sewall, Diary of Samuel Sewall (1973 ed.), p. 14.
  8. [S123] Clarence Almon Torrey, New England Marriages Prior to 1700.
  9. [S102] Annie Haven Thwing, Inhabitants of the Town of Boston, 54163.
  10. [S34] Unverified internet information, http://www.sjchs-history.org/chiefjus.html#samuelsewall
  11. [S183] Edward W. McGlenen, Boston Marriages, Boston, MA Marriages 1646 - 1751 from the Record Commissioners Report 9 (1649 - 1699) and from the Record Commissioners Report 150 (1700 - 1751) Published 1898.
  12. [S25] Samuel Sewall, Diary of Samuel Sewall (1973 ed.), p. 1077.
  13. [S24] Sarah Elizabeth Titcomb, Early New England People, p.221.
  14. [S26] Hector Livingston Duff, Sewells in the New World, p.24.
  15. [S8] John Langdon Sibley, Biographical Sketches, 1659-1677., p.359.

Samuel Earl Sewall1

M, b. 2 October 1900, d. 28 May 1910
     Samuel Earl Sewall was born on 2 October 1900 in Cambridge, Massachusetts.1 He was the son of Samuel Farrington Sewall and Luella Frances Clark.1 Samuel Earl Sewall died on 28 May 1910 in Burlington, Massachusetts, at the age of 9 of tubercular meningitis.1

Citations

  1. [S130] Massachusetts Vital Records, Massachusetts Vital Records, 1841-1910.

Samuel Edgar Sewall1

M, b. 26 December 1849, d. 17 September 1851
     Samuel Edgar Sewall was born on 26 December 1849.1 He was the son of Samuel Sewall and Mary T. Dunbar.1 Samuel Edgar Sewall died on 17 September 1851 in North Bridgewater, Massachusetts, at the age of 1 of dysentery.1,2

Citations

  1. [S153] Charles Nelson Sinnett, Sinnett's Sewall genealogy, p. 46.
  2. [S130] Massachusetts Vital Records, Massachusetts Vital Records, 1841-1910.

Samuel Edmund Sewall1

M, b. 9 November 1799, d. 20 December 1888
Samuel Edmund Sewell
(1799-1888)
     Samuel Edmund Sewall was born on 9 November 1799 in a house in or near Sudbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts.2 He was the son of Hon. Joseph Sewall and Mary Robie. Samuel Edmund Sewall was educated at Phillips Exeter Academy where he was prepared for Harvard which he entered in 1813. In 1817 he joined the first class of the newly established Harvard Law School.3 He graduated in 1817 from Harvard A.B., A.M. and LL.B. in 1820.4,5 Admitted to the bar 5 January 1821.6 He was a lawyer in partnership with Willard Phillips in 1821.6 Through the influence of William Lloyd Garrison, he became an abolitionist and his early practice included many cases of run-away slaves under arrest. He also helped Garrison financially in the organization of the Liberator. He was one of the counselors at the trial of John Brown by the commonwealth of Virginia, Oct. 27–31, 1859. He was the candidate of the Liberal party for governor of Massachusetts. He recognized the legal and social advance of women, and in memory of his efforts to further this advancement, a marble bust of Mr. Sewall was given to Memorial Hall, Lexington, Mass., with an inscription by his friend, John G. Whittier.5 He married firstly Louisa Maria Winslow, daughter of Nathan Winslow and Comfort Hussey, on 9 June 1836 at Portland, Cumberland, Maine, The wedding was set for 8th June but was delayed, probably only for a day. The wedding was kept secret because the bride's family were Quakers and Samuel Sewall was a Unitarian.7,8 Samuel Edmund Sewall married secondly Harriet Winslow, daughter of Nathan Winslow and Comfort Hussey, on 18 June 1857 at Portland, Maine.9,10 In 1882 Samuel Edmund Sewall was living in Melrose.11 He died on 20 December 1888 in 4 Park Street, Boston, Massachusetts, at the age of 89 an enlarged prostate, though the public version was an attack of pneumonia.12 His funeral of took place on 23 December 1888 at the Church of the Disciples, Boston, a fitting innovation on this occasion was the participation of women as pall bearers. These were Mrs. Lucy Stone, Mrs. Julia Ward Howe, Mrs. Ednah D. Cheney, Mrs. Mary A. Livermore, Miss Sarah S. Southwick and Miss Anne Whitney; to these were joined Henry I. Bowditch, John C. Ropes, Frederic Tudor, George A. Day, William Lloyd Garrison and Frank J. Garrison. The burial took place at Mount Auburn.13

Children of Samuel Edmund Sewall and Louisa Maria Winslow

Citations

  1. [S124] Samuel (Rev.) Sewall, Pedigree of Sewall.
  2. [S3] Nina Moore Tiffany, Samuel E. Sewell: a memoir, p. 10.
  3. [S3] Nina Moore Tiffany, Samuel E. Sewell: a memoir, p.12.
  4. [S3] Nina Moore Tiffany, Samuel E. Sewell: a memoir, p.13.
  5. [S18] Various editors, Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans, Vol. 9, p. 211.
  6. [S3] Nina Moore Tiffany, Samuel E. Sewell: a memoir, p.17.
  7. [S3] Nina Moore Tiffany, Samuel E. Sewell: a memoir, p. 32.
  8. [S89] Family Search, Vital Records Index North America.
  9. [S205] Newspaper, Boston Daily Advertiser, (Boston, MA) Tuesday, June 23, 1857.
  10. [S205] Newspaper, The Congregationalist, (Boston, MA) Friday, June 26, 1857.
  11. [S24] Sarah Elizabeth Titcomb, Early New England People, p. 223.
  12. [S130] Massachusetts Vital Records, Massachusetts Vital Records, 1841-1910.
  13. [S160] New York Times, 24 Dec 1888 p. 5.
  14. [S3] Nina Moore Tiffany, Samuel E. Sewell: a memoir, p.83.

Samuel Egbert Sewall1

M, b. 31 March 1875, d. 1959
     Samuel Egbert Sewall was born on 31 March 1875 in Everett, Massachusetts.2,3 He was the son of Capt. Samuel Johnson Mills Sewall and Francella Augusta Cunningham.1 Samuel Egbert Sewall married Mabel Caroline Johnson, daughter of Christian E. Johnson and Hannah Lyon, on 28 September 1898 in Everett, Massachusetts.4 Samuel Egbert Sewall appears on the census of 1900 as an electrician.5 He died in 1959.1

Children of Samuel Egbert Sewall and Mabel Caroline Johnson

Citations

  1. [S34] Unverified internet information, http://www.spoonergen.com/trees/US-William/d0004/…
  2. [S107] 1880 US Census.
  3. [S130] Massachusetts Vital Records, Vol: 269 ; Page: 92.
  4. [S89] Family Search, Massachusetts Marriages, 1841-1915.
  5. [S208] 1900 US Census, Everett Ward 1, Middlesex, Massachusetts.
  6. [S207] 1910 US Census, Medford Ward 6, Middlesex, Massachusetts.

Samuel Farrington Sewall1

M, b. 6 February 1875, d. before 1940
     Samuel Farrington Sewall was born on 6 February 1875 in Burlington, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.2,3 He was the son of Samuel Brown Sewall and Louisa Elizabeth Farrington.4 Samuel Farrington Sewall married Luella Frances Clark, daughter of Edwin S. Clark and Helen M. Gilman, on 16 August 1898 in Methuen, Massachusetts, the marriage was conducted by Charles H. Oliphant, Minister of the Gospel.1 He gives his occupation as street car conductor in the registration of his marriage.1 Samuel Farrington Sewall appear on the census of 1930 at Burlington, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, he is a caretaker at a cemetery.5 He died before 1940.6

Children of Samuel Farrington Sewall and Luella Frances Clark

Citations

  1. [S130] Massachusetts Vital Records, Massachusetts Vital Records, 1841-1910.
  2. [S208] 1900 US Census, Cambridge Ward 5, Middlesex, Massachusetts.
  3. [S89] Family Search, United States World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918.
  4. [S87] Kate Hogenson, Communication from K. Hogenson, Descendants of Charles Chauncy Sewall @ Jan 2005.
  5. [S231] 1930 US Census, Burlington, Middlesex, Massachusetts.
  6. [S585] 1940 US Census, Burlington, Middlesex, Massachusetts.

Samuel Greene Sewall1

M, b. 2 June 1823, d. 29 December 1911
     Samuel Greene Sewall. Merchant.2 He was born on 2 June 1823 in Boston, Massachusetts.1 He was the son of William Sewall and Sarah Ladd.3 Samuel Greene Sewall married Sarah Cornelia Otis on 1 May 1845 in Woburn the marriage was performed by Rev. Mr. Bennett. (Intentions 25 March 1845.)4,5 Samuel Greene Sewall and Sarah Cornelia Otis appear on the census of 15 June 1870 at Bath, Maine, together with their son Hardy. Samuel Sewall is listed as RR Depot master.6 Samuel Greene Sewall married secondly Anna Maria Otis, daughter of William E. Otis and Susan (Unknown), on 30 March 1874 in Boston, Massachusetts.7 Samuel Greene Sewall died on 29 December 1911 in New York City at the age of 88.8
He became a hardware merchant at Boston; did other business successively at Sacramento, Cal. Toronto Can. and Augusta, Me; was made 2nd Lt of the 11th reg. of Me vols in 1861 and was a Capt. at the war's end; is or was lately serving with a different corps at Dakota. Sketches of the Alumni of Dartmouth College, 1771-1867.

Children of Samuel Greene Sewall and Sarah Cornelia Otis

Citations

  1. [S364] Eben Graves, The descendants of Henry Sewall. Vol. II (Unpublished), #278.
  2. [S130] Massachusetts Vital Records, Massachusetts Vital Records, 1841-1910.
  3. [S107] 1880 US Census, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts.
  4. [S130] Massachusetts Vital Records, Vital Records of Cambridge, Massachusetts to the Year 1850.
  5. [S205] Newspaper, Boston Courier, (Boston, MA) Monday, May 05, 1845.
  6. [S209] 1870 US Census, Maine, Sagadahoc, Bath.
  7. [S130] Massachusetts Vital Records, Vol: 264 ; Page: 50.
  8. [S89] Family Search, United States Veterans Administration Pension Payment Cards, 1907-1933.
  9. [S154] 1860 US Census, Maine, Kennebec, Augusta.
  10. [S89] Family Search, Woburn records of births, deaths, and marriages.

Capt. Samuel Johnson Mills Sewall1,2

M, b. 17 March 1824, d. 5 December 1902
Samuel J.M. Sewall
(1824-1902)
     Capt. Samuel Johnson Mills Sewall. A sailor.3 He was born on 17 March 1824 in Edgecomb, Maine.4 He was the son of Rufus K. Sewall and Phoebe Merrill.1 Capt. Samuel Johnson Mills Sewall appears on the census of 1850 at Edgecomb, Lincoln County, Maine, listed as a mariner.5 He married firstly Ellen Mitchell, daughter of John S. Mitchell and Philenia Sewall, on 26 April 1856 in Gardiner, Maine.6 Capt. Samuel Johnson Mills Sewall married secondly Francella Augusta Cunningham, daughter of Thomas Cunningham and Betsey Gove, on 30 March 1863 in Edgecomb, Maine.7,6 Capt. Samuel Johnson Mills Sewall died on 5 December 1902 in Everett, Massachusetts, at the age of 78 of apoplexy.4

Children of Capt. Samuel Johnson Mills Sewall and Francella Augusta Cunningham

Citations

  1. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.
  2. [S205] Newspaper, Boston Daily Globe, 18 March 1898.
  3. [S107] 1880 US Census.
  4. [S130] Massachusetts Vital Records, Massachusetts Vital Records, 1841-1910.
  5. [S109] 1850 United States Census, Edgecomb, Lincoln, Maine.
  6. [S364] Eben Graves, The descendants of Henry Sewall. Vol. II (Unpublished).
  7. [S89] Family Search, Unverified source.
  8. [S34] Unverified internet information, http://www.spoonergen.com/trees/US-William/d0004/…

Samuel Jordan Sewall1

M, b. 1 March 1879, d. 4 September 1953
     Samuel Jordan Sewall. Superintendent of the Wiscasset & Waterville railroad.1 He was born on 1 March 1879 in Wiscasset, Maine.2 He was the son of Frederick Wood Sewall and Isabella Frost Jordan.1 Samuel Jordan Sewall married Katherine E. McKenzie, daughter of William H. McKenzie and Nettie Nute, on 12 October 1904 in Wiscasset, Maine.2 Samuel Jordan Sewall died on 4 September 1953 in Bath Memorial Hospital, Maine, at the age of 74.3
Samuel J Sewall, 74. died at Bath Memorial hospital Friday, Sept 4, where he had been a patient for about four weeks. He was born in Wiscasset, son of the late Frederick W. and Isabelle Jordan Sewall, was educated in Wiscasset schools, graduating from Wiscasset High school in 1897 and from a Portland business college. Graduating from business college he went to Boston where he was employed in a bank. He resigned this position to accept a position in the office of the Superintendent of the Wiscasset, Waterville and Farmington Railroad and on the reorganisation of the road and its purchase by the late Carson C. Peck, he was chosen general manager which position he held till shortly before the road ceased operation. He served the town of Wiscasset as treasurer for about 20 years and also served as as tax collector for several years He was a most faithful officer, extremely careful as to detail and was a great help to all the municipal officers. He was also treasurer of the Congregational church, of the Wiscasset Cemetery association and of Lincoln County chapter, American Red Cross from the time of its reorganisation till one year ago. For many years he was a member of Lincoln Lodge of Masons, of New Jerusalem Royal Arch Chapter, Garrison Hill Chapter, O.E.S. and the Commander in Waterville. He was also a member of Wiscasset Fire Society for several years. Perhaps the organisation which was dearest to him was Wiscasset Academy Alumni association of which he was a prominent member from its organization on to the time of his passing. Surviving are the widow, two daughters, Mrs Carroll B. Sproul of Wiscasset and Mrs Charles Pugh of Ithan, Penn, and four grandchildren. Services were held at the Congregational Church, Sunday afternoon. Stanley Johnson, pastor of the Church officiating. The services were attended by a very large number of friends and acquaintances and the floral offerings were great and beautiful The bearers were members of Lincoln Lodge of Masons and interment was in the family lot in Woodlawn Cemetery Prior to the service a prayer for the family was offered by Mr Johnson at the home. Bath Independent, September 10, 1953.3

Children of Samuel Jordan Sewall and Katherine E. McKenzie

Citations

  1. [S474] George Thomas Little, Genealogy of Maine, p. 122.
  2. [S89] Family Search, Maine, Vital Records, 1670-1907.
  3. [S205] Newspaper, Bath Independent, September 10, 1953.
  4. [S232] Ancestry.com, Maine, Birth Records, 1621-1922.

Samuel L. Sewall1

M, b. 5 October 1894, d. 27 February 1945
     Samuel L. Sewall was born on 5 October 1894 in St. Paul, Ramsey County, Minnesota.2,3 He was the son of Samuel Lovatt Sewall and Jessie Douglas Newson.1 Samuel L. Sewall graduated in 1916 A.B. from Harvard.4 Served in the French Bureau of Inventions and as a 1st Lt. in the U.S. Signal Corps in France in World War I.4 He married Charlotte Mary O'Malley in 1923.1 Samuel L. Sewall died on 27 February 1945 in Hennepin County, Minnesota, at the age of 50.5

Children of Samuel L. Sewall and Charlotte Mary O'Malley

Citations

  1. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.
  2. [S232] Ancestry.com, U.S. Passport Applications, 1795-1925.
  3. [S89] Family Search, Minnesota, Births and Christenings, 1840-1980.
  4. [S189] Frederick A. Virkus, Abridged Compendium of American Genealogy, Vol. 2. p. 156.
  5. [S232] Ancestry.com, Minnesota Death Index, 1908-2002.

Chief Justice Samuel Sewall LL.D.

M, b. 11 December 1757, d. 8 June 1814
Samuel Sewell (1757-1814)
     Chief Justice Samuel Sewall LL.D. was born on 11 December 1757 in Boston, Massachusetts.1 He was the son of Samuel Sewall and Elizabeth Quincy. Chief Justice Samuel Sewall LL.D. graduated in 1776 from Harvard A.B., A.M., 1779 and practised law in his home town of Marblehead. He was a Representative in the State Legislature for several terms and a Representative from Massachusetts in the 5th and 6th Congresses, 1797-1801. He was a member of the Electoral College of 1801 from the 2nd Massachusetts district. The honourary degree of LL.D. was conferred on him by Harvard in 1808. He was a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.1 He married Abigail Devereaux, daughter of Dr. Humphrey Devereaux and Anna Henchman, on 8 December 1781. Between 1801 and 1813 he was a a Judge of the Supreme Court.1 Between 1813 and 1814 he was a Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Massachusetts.1 Chief Justice Samuel Sewall LL.D. died on 8 June 1814 in Wiscassett, Maine, at the age of 56 said to have been whilst sitting in court, however an article in the Boston Gazette says he was seized of a severe pain in his chest in the morning and died at 9 in the evening.2 He was buried in the ancient cemetery at Wiscasset but later re-interred in the family tomb at Marblehead.3

Children of Chief Justice Samuel Sewall LL.D. and Abigail Devereaux

Citations

  1. [S18] Various editors, Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans, Vol. 9, p. 211.
  2. [S8] John Langdon Sibley, Biographical Sketches, 1659-1677., p.359.
  3. [S128] NEHGS, Cemetery transcriptions.
  4. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.

Samuel Lovatt Sewall

M, b. 27 June 1862, d. 7 January 1938
     Samuel Lovatt Sewall. Secretary and treasurer of the Minneaplis Iron and Stove Company of Minneapolis. He was born on 27 June 1862 in Wilmington, Delaware.1 He was the son of Edmund Quincy Sewall and Louisa Kilham Lovett.2 Samuel Lovatt Sewall married firstly Jessie Douglas Newson, daughter of Hon. Thomas M. Newson, on 26 June 1890 at St. Paul, Minnesota.1,3 Samuel Lovatt Sewall married secondly Mary Elizabeth Norris, daughter of John Mahan Norris and Grace Eastman, on 2 June 1909 at Minneapolis, Minnesota.1 Samuel Lovatt Sewall was living in 224 Ridgewood Av., Minneapolis, Minnesota.1 He died on 7 January 1938 in Hennepin County, Minnesota, at the age of 75.4
S.L. Sewall Leaves Estate of $100,000
An estate of more than $100,000 was left by Samuel L. Sewall, 75, 224 Ridgewood avenue, vice president and treasurer of the Minneapolis Iron Store Co., who died January 7, according to a probate petition filed Monday. Heirs named in the petition are the widow, Mrs. Elizabeth Sewall: a son, Samuel, named executor in the will, and a daughter, Mrs. Eleanor Sewall Prosser. The petition says that the estate consists of real estate worth $5,500 and personal property in excess of $100,000.5

Children of Samuel Lovatt Sewall and Jessie Douglas Newson

Citations

  1. [S189] Frederick A. Virkus, Abridged Compendium of American Genealogy, Vol. 2. p. 156.
  2. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.
  3. [S205] Newspaper, St. Paul Daily Globe., June 27, 1890.
  4. [S232] Ancestry.com, Minnesota Death Index, 1908-2002.
  5. [S205] Newspaper, Star Tribune, 18 January 1938.

Rev. Samuel M. Sewall

M, b. 6 April 1772, d. 15 March 1851
     Rev. Samuel M. Sewall was born on 6 April 1772 in Bath, Maine.1 He was the son of Colonel Dummer Sewall and Mary Dunning. Rev. Samuel M. Sewall married Mary Lambard, daughter of Joseph Lombard and Hannah Booker, on 27 October 1794.1,2 He was a Ordained to the pastoral charge of the congregational church in Summer, Maine and for more than 40 years a preacher of the gospel.3 Rev. Samuel M. Sewall died on 15 March 1851 at the age of 78.3

Children of Rev. Samuel M. Sewall and Mary Lambard

Citations

  1. [S106] Maine Families in 1790, Vol. 3 p. 250.
  2. [S153] Charles Nelson Sinnett, Sinnett's Sewall genealogy, p. 26.
  3. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.
  4. [S153] Charles Nelson Sinnett, Sinnett's Sewall genealogy, p. 45.
  5. [S46] Various contributors, Daughters of the American Revolution, Vol. 77 p. 106.
  6. [S153] Charles Nelson Sinnett, Sinnett's Sewall genealogy, p. 46.
  7. [S153] Charles Nelson Sinnett, Sinnett's Sewall genealogy, p. 47.
  8. [S153] Charles Nelson Sinnett, Sinnett's Sewall genealogy, p. 48.

Samuel Moody Sewall1

M, b. 17 December 1806, d. 1 September 1851
     Samuel Moody Sewall was born on 17 December 1806 in Chesterville, Franklin County, Maine.1,2 He was the son of Dummer Sewall and Jenny Dunning.1 Samuel Moody Sewall married Hannah H. Johnson.1 Samuel Moody Sewall died on 1 September 1851 in Wisconsin at the age of 44.

Children of Samuel Moody Sewall and Hannah H. Johnson

Citations

  1. [S153] Charles Nelson Sinnett, Sinnett's Sewall genealogy, p. 34.
  2. [S89] Family Search, Vital records, 1802-1892 (1918) Chesterville (Maine). Town Clerk.
  3. [S109] 1850 United States Census, Whitewater, Walworth, Wisconsin.