John Livingston1

M, b. 19 May 1777
     John Livingston was born on 19 May 1777.1 He was the son of James Livingston and Elizabeth Simpson.1

Citations

  1. [S480] Emma Ten Broek Runk, The Ten Broeck Genealogy, #417.

Colonel John Livingston1

M, b. 26 April 1680, d. 19 February 1719/20
     Colonel John Livingston was born on 26 April 1680 in New York.1,2,3 He was the son of Hon. Robert Livingston, "First Lord of the Manor" and Alida Schuyler.1 Colonel John Livingston married firstly Mary Winthrop, daughter of Governor Fitz-John Winthrop, in April 1701 at New London, Connecticut.2 Livingston's marriage to Governor Fitz-John Winthrop's daughter was no doubt instrumental in his taking up residence in New London and subsequently receiving a commission in the Connecticut militia. He had served previously in the New York militia. When not occupied by military affairs, Livingston was a merchant. In 1701 he owned the sloop Mary, in partnership with his brother-in-law, Samuel Vetch. They became involved in the illegal but profitable trade with Canada, a trade which soon came to the attention of colonial authorities. As late as 1706 it was rumoured that Livingston was still involved in such nefarious activities. During 1706-7 Livingston represented New London as a deputy to the general assembly. He also speculated in Indian lands during this period.
Livingston's restless nature suited him well for the life of a soldier. Known as "the Mohauk," he acquired great influence among the New England Indians, especially the Five Nations. His ability to control the Indians marked him as a valuable asset to colonial commanders. In August 1704 after the outbreak of Queen Anne's War, he commanded a company of "Volunteers English & Indians to reinforce the Frontiers." A month later Livingston had his "first adventure" in "a publick capassety" when his father-in-law appointed him "to visit the 5 Nations" with commissioners appointed by Governor Dudley of Massachusetts. Though the commissioners gained assurances that the Five Nations would "take up the Hatchet," this support was not utilized at the time.

Livingston was serving as a Connecticut officer on the Massachusetts frontier early in 1705 when he learned that Dudley was sending a delegation to Quebec to negotiate an exchange of prisoners. Livingston volunteered and was sent overland from Albany to begin negotiations. Although "the Expense and Industry of our Commissioners in this Affair was very great," release was obtained for only a few of the 117 captives, most notably the Reverend John Williams. Livingston, termed a "very honourable man" by Governor RIGAUD de Vaudreuil, returned to New England in June 1705 with Captain Augustin le Gardeur de Courtemanche, the French governor's agent for the exchange of prisoners, who continued the negotiations with Dudley.

In 1709 Livingston, now a major, prepared to take part in the still-born Vetch expedition against Quebec. A year later he was again with Vetch, this time as commander of a party of Indians which flanked the main body of troops in the successful expedition led by Francis Nicholson against Port-Royal (Annapolis Royal, N.S.) With Auger de Subercase's surrender in October 1710, a council of war resolved that Livingston, accompanied by the Baron de Saint-Castin Ernard-Anselme d'Abbadie, "should go to the Governour of Canada, about the exchange of Captives, and inform him how Matters were" at Annapolis Royal. Livingston was, as Vetch put it, "perhaps the only Brittish subject of any figure or character capable of such extraordinary undertakings." The "Journall" that he kept attests to the arduous nature of this mission, which would have come to an early end had not Saint-Castin intervened to save Livingston from death "in a barbarous manner" at the hands of a distraught Indian. After almost two months' hard travel, Livingston arrived in December 1710 at Quebec where he was received "with all imaginable marks of civillity." His time in Quebec was well spent. While awaiting the arrival from Montreal of Hertel de Rouville and Simon Dupuy, agents whom Vaudreuil was sending to New England to continue the negotiations and "to obtain information through them of the movements of our enemies," Livingston prepared notes for "A View of Canada," an account of the fortifications and troops at Quebec. This was probably the chief purpose of the mission, for a successful expedition against Quebec had long been in Vetch's mind.

Livingston returned to New England late in February 1710/11 and at Vetch's urging prepared to leave for England. It was hoped that his knowledge of Canada could be used to persuade the court to renew plans for a general assault on New France. Stormy weather postponed his trip and word from England that another expedition was under way made it unnecessary. As preparations for the Walker expedition began, Livingston's knowledge of Quebec was utilized by both Admiral Walker and General John Hill. Livingston was questioned by the general "about the situation and works of Quebec, and was thought to give a very good account of it." The failure of Walker to navigate the St Lawrence successfully meant that Livingston's knowledge of Quebec could not be put to use.
Having "a verry great sway amongst them," Livingston, now a colonel, spent the better part of the next year and a half recruiting Iroquois for scouting work around Annapolis Royal and as a result was "considerably out of pockett." The fort was deprived of the officer best able to control the Indians when Livingston left at the end of 1712. He returned to New London where he was granted the right to erect a saw-mill in 1713. He liquidated his holdings there in 1718 and sailed for England where he hoped to recoup the money he had lost in supplying the garrison at Annapolis Royal. His early death denied him the honour of succeeding his father as the second lord of the Livingston manor in New York.

Although he was tied by blood or marriage to some of the most important families in New England, Livingston remains an obscure figure who moved only at the edges of the important events of his time; a figure who appeared to be more at home with the Indians than with his fellow colonials.4 Colonel John Livingston married secondly Elizabeth Knight, daughter of Mrs Sarah Knight, on 1 October 1713 at Boston.2 Colonel John Livingston died on 19 February 1719/20 at the age of 39 s.n.p.2

Citations

  1. [S44] George Dangerfield, Chancellor Livingston, Chart.
  2. [S58] Various Editors, Dictionary of Canadian Biography, vol. II p. 436.
  3. [S131] George Norbury MacKenzie, Colonial families of the United States, Vol. VI p. 334.
  4. [S58] Various Editors, Dictionary of Canadian Biography, vol. II p. 436 etc. article by John David Krugler.

Sir John Livingston, Lord of Callendar1

M, d. 1402
     Sir John Livingston, Lord of Callendar was the son of Sir William de Livingston, and Christian de Callendar.1 Sir John Livingston, Lord of Callendar married secondly Agnes Douglas of Dalkeith in 1381.2 Sir John Livingston, Lord of Callendar married firstly Daughter of John Menteith, of Kerse, daughter of John Menteith of Kerse.1 Sir John Livingston, Lord of Callendar died in 1402 slain at the battle of Homildon Hill (Northumberland) where the Earl of Northumberland and his son Hotspur defeated the Earl of Douglas and Duke of Albany.1

Citations

  1. [S26] Hector Livingston Duff, Sewells in the New World, p. 111.
  2. [S163] Edwin Brockholst Livingston, Livingstons of Callendar, p. 485.

John Henry Livingston1

M, b. 8 July 1848, d. 27 January 1927
     John Henry Livingston. Lawyer. He was born on 8 July 1848 in Oak Hill, Columbia County, New York.1 He was the son of Clermont Livingston and Cornelia Livingston.1 John Henry Livingston graduated in 1869 from Columbia.1 He married firstly Catherine Livingston Hamersley, daughter of John William Hamersley, on 2 November 1871.2 John Henry Livingston married Alice Delafield Clarkson, daughter of Howard Clarkson, on 9 November 1906.2 John Henry Livingston died on 27 January 1927 at the age of 78.2

Child of John Henry Livingston and Catherine Livingston Hamersley

Citations

  1. [S80] Arthur Meredyth Burke, Prominent Families, Livingston.
  2. [S81] Burke, Landed Gentry, p. 2792.
  3. [S81] Burke, Landed Gentry, p. 2793.

Rev. John Henry Livingston1

M, b. 30 May 1746, d. 20 January 1825
     Rev. John Henry Livingston. President of Queen's College, New Jersey.2 He was born on 30 May 1746 in Poughkeepsie, Dutchess County, New York.3,4 He was the son of Henry Livingston and Susan Conklin.1 Rev. John Henry Livingston married Sarah Livingston, daughter of Philip Livingston and Christina Ten Broeck, on 26 November 1775 in Kingston, Ulster County, New York.5,6,4 Rev. John Henry Livingston died on 20 January 1825 in New Brunswick at the age of 78 The Synod resolved that a monumental stone should be erected above his grave

Sacred To the Memory of the Rev. JOHN H. LIVINGSTON, D. D. S. T. P.
Born at Poughkeepsie, State of New-York, May 30th 1746. Educated for the Ministry at the University of Utrecht, in Holland. Called to the pastoral office of the Reformed Dutch Church in New-York, 1770. Appointed by the General Synod of the Reformed Dutch Church in America, their Professor of Didactic and Polemic Theology in 1784. And elected to the Presidency of Queen's College, New-Jersey, in 1810. There, in performance of the duties of his office, and blessed in the enjoyment of mental energy, high reputation, and distinguished usefulness, he suddenly, but sweetly fell asleep in Jesus, January 20th, 1825, in the 79th year of his age, the 55th of his Ministry, and the 41st of his Professoral labours.7,4

Child of Rev. John Henry Livingston and Sarah Livingston

Citations

  1. [S44] George Dangerfield, Chancellor Livingston, chart.
  2. [S80] Arthur Meredyth Burke, Prominent Families, Livingston.
  3. [S479] Alexander Gunn, Livingstom memoirs, p. 35.
  4. [S480] Emma Ten Broek Runk, The Ten Broeck Genealogy, #227.
  5. [S131] George Norbury MacKenzie, Colonial families of the United States, Vol. VI p. 337.
  6. [S479] Alexander Gunn, Livingstom memoirs, p. 249.
  7. [S479] Alexander Gunn, Livingstom memoirs, p. 476.
  8. [S480] Emma Ten Broek Runk, The Ten Broeck Genealogy, #455.

John Lafitte Livingston

M, b. 9 December 1773, d. 25 April 1776
     John Lafitte Livingston was born on 9 December 1773. He was the son of Peter Robert Livingston and Margaret Livingston. John Lafitte Livingston died on 25 April 1776 at the age of 2.

Rev. John Livingston of Ancrum1

M, b. 21 June 1603, d. August 1672
     Rev. John Livingston of Ancrum was born on 21 June 1603 in Monyabroch, Kilsyth, Stirlingshire, Scotland.2 He was the son of Rev. William Livingston and Agnes Livingston.3,4 Rev. John Livingston of Ancrum married Janet Fleming, daughter of Bartholomew Fleming and Marion Hamilton, on 23 June 1635 in West Church, Edinburgh, she was the eldest daughter of Bartholomew Fleming, of that well-known Scottish family, the head of which was the Earl of Wigton, who with his son Lord Fleming was present at the wedding of his kinsman's daughter Janet.5,1,6 Rev. John Livingston of Ancrum died in August 1672 in Rotterdam, Holland, at the age of 69 sometime between 14 and 21 August.1,5

At the age of ten years was sent to a Latin school, where we are told "Mr. William Wallace, an good man and a learned humanist was school-master." He subsequently spent four years at the University of Glasgow, and was graduated as a master of arts. Licensed in January, 1625, he commenced to preach at his father's and neighbouring churches, but his aversion to Episcopal ceremonies prevented him for several years from being ordained minister and obtaining the presentation to a living in Scotland. In 1630 he accepted the invitation of Viscount Clandeboye to take charge of the parish of Killinchy in Ireland. He was there a year when the Bishop suspended him for non-conformity, but through the intervention of Archbishop Usher, the suspension was raised after a short time. The Scottish bishops, however, brought pressure to bear on the Irish government, and on May 4, 1632, he was again deposed for non-conformity. This suspension lasted two years.

Later he made several futile attempts to emigrate to America. He was in Scotland in 1637, taking a prominent part in the movement of the solemn league and covenant, venturing to London in 1638 "with several copies of the covenant and letters to friends at Court." In November, 1638, he was a member of the General Assembly, which met at Glasgow, and with the exception of that, which convened at Aberdeen in 1640, served in each General Assembly until 1650.
He acted as chaplain of the regiment of the Earl of Cassillis, when England was invaded by the Covenanters. In 1641 he was in attendance on the Scots army in Ireland under Sir George Monro. Between 1642 and 1648 he was employed on a series of missions to Ireland. In the latter year he was transferred by the General Assembly to Ancrum in Roxburghshire. In 1650 he was nominated by the Church of Scotland as one of the three delegates on the commission sent by the Committee of Estates to treat with Charles II, then at Breda, as to the conditions upon which he would be permitted to land in Scotland. Cromwell had his name inserted as one of the ministers in the ordinance of August 8, 1654, for settling the affairs of the Church of Scotland and "for certifying such as were proper to be admitted to a benefice."

For refusing to honour the anniversary of the restoration of King Charles II as a "holiday of the Lord" he was ordered to appear before the Privy Council on December 9, 1662, but being forewarned, left Ancrum before the messenger arrived with the summons and went to Edinburgh, where he remained "close for some days" while his friends were ascertaining what the government proposed to do. He appeared before the Council and was ultimately sentenced to banishment within two months and ordered to leave Edinburgh within forty-eight hours for the north side of Tay and there to remain "till he depart forth out of the country."

He remained at Leith until April 9th, when he boarded "old John Allan's ship" for Rotterdam. Here he spent the last few years of his life. Much of his time was occupied in compiling a polyglot Bible and preparing a new Latin translation of the Old Testament. His wife and two of his children joined him the following December; the other five then living remained in Scotland.

Children of Rev. John Livingston of Ancrum and Janet Fleming

Citations

  1. [S40] Unknown compiler, "The Honourable William Smith 1728-1793", Ancestral File, p51.
  2. [S131] George Norbury MacKenzie, Colonial families of the United States, Vol. VI p. 333.
  3. [S26] Hector Livingston Duff, Sewells in the New World, p. 114.
  4. [S26] Hector Livingston Duff, Sewells in the New World, p. 115.
  5. [S26] Hector Livingston Duff, Sewells in the New World, p. 116.
  6. [S55] Ruth Lawrence, Livingstone, p. 54.
  7. [S80] Arthur Meredyth Burke, Prominent Families, Livingston.
  8. [S62] William Richard Cutter, New England Families.
  9. [S131] George Norbury MacKenzie, Colonial families of the United States, Vol. VI p. 334.
  10. [S40] Unknown compiler, "The Honourable William Smith 1728-1793", Ancestral File, p.9 chart.
  11. [S54] Unknown compiler, "New York State Museum Website", Ancestral File.

John Livingston of Drumry1

M, d. circa 1366
     John Livingston of Drumry was the son of Sir William de Livingston, Lord of Gorgyn, Craigmillar and Drumry and Margaret Comyn ?2 John Livingston of Drumry died circa 1366.1

Citations

  1. [S163] Edwin Brockholst Livingston, Livingstons of Callendar, p. 485.
  2. [S26] Hector Livingston Duff, Sewells in the New World, p. 111.

John P. Livingston

M, b. 1793
     John P. Livingston was born in 1793.1 He was the son of Abraham Livingston and Maria Peoples.

Citations

  1. [S480] Emma Ten Broek Runk, The Ten Broeck Genealogy, #428.

John Robert Livingston1

M, b. 13 February 1755, d. 25 September 1851
     John Robert Livingston was born on 13 February 1755.2 He was the son of Judge Robert Robert Livingston and Margaret Beekman.1 John Robert Livingston married firstly Margaret Sheaffe, daughter of William Sheaffe, on 20 July 1779 there was no issue of this marriage.3 John Robert Livingston married secondly Eliza McEvers, daughter of Charles McEvers, on 30 May 1789 there are supposed to be eight children of this marriage.1,2 John Robert Livingston was living in Massena, Dutchess County, New York.4 He died on 25 September 1851 at the age of 96.4

Citations

  1. [S44] George Dangerfield, Chancellor Livingston, chart.
  2. [S80] Arthur Meredyth Burke, Prominent Families, Livingston.
  3. [S83] NEHGR, Vol. 125, p. 64.
  4. [S131] George Norbury MacKenzie, Colonial families of the United States, Vol. VI p. 336.

John Swift Livingston1

M, b. 1785
     John Swift Livingston was born in 1785.2 He was the son of Robert Cambridge Livingston and Alice Swift.1 John Swift Livingston married Anna Maria Martina Thompson.

Children of John Swift Livingston and Anna Maria Martina Thompson

Citations

  1. [S81] Burke, Landed Gentry, p. 2792.
  2. [S250] Saint Nicholas Society, Vol. 1. p 101.

John W. Livingston1

M
     John W. Livingston was the son of John Livingston and Catherine de Peyster.1 John W. Livingston married Ann Sanders.1

Child of John W. Livingston and Ann Sanders

Citations

  1. [S113] William Addams Reitwiesner, Bush ancestry.

John W. Livingston1

M
     John W. Livingston was the son of John W. Livingston and Ann Sanders.1 John W. Livingston married Julia Broome.1

Child of John W. Livingston and Julia Broome

Citations

  1. [S113] William Addams Reitwiesner, Bush ancestry.

Johnston Livingston1

M
     Johnston Livingston was the son of John Swift Livingston and Anna Maria Martina Thompson.1

Citations

  1. [S250] Saint Nicholas Society, Vol. 1. p 101.

Judith Livingston1

F, b. 4 September 1785, d. 28 February 1858
     Judith Livingston was born on 4 September 1785 in Poughkeepsie, New York.2 She was the daughter of Gilbert James Livingston and Susanna Lewis.1 Judith Livingston married Samuel Herrick Butler on 26 June 1806 in Waterford, New York.1 Judith Livingston died on 28 February 1858 in Columbus, Ohio, at the age of 72.

Child of Judith Livingston and Samuel Herrick Butler

Citations

  1. [S132] Gary Boyd Roberts, The Royal Descents of 600 Immigrants, p. 129.
  2. [S89] Family Search, New York, Births and Christenings, 1640-1962.

Julia Livingston1

F, b. 15 September 1801, d. 23 June 1882
     Julia Livingston was born on 15 September 1801 in Staatsburgh.1 She was the daughter of Judge Maturin Livingston and Margaret Lewis.1 Julia Livingston married Major Joseph Delafield, son of John Delafield and Ann Hallett, on 12 December 1833. Julia Livingston died on 23 June 1882 in New York at the age of 80.1

Citations

  1. [S167] William S. Pelletreau, Wills of the Smith families, p. 127.

Katharine Livingston1

F, b. 10 April 1873, d. 1 February 1933
     Katharine Livingston was born on 10 April 1873.1 She was the daughter of John Henry Livingston and Catherine Livingston Hamersley.1 Katharine Livingston married Capt. Lawrence Timpson, son of Theodore Timpson and Mary Hasbrouck, on 2 June 1900.1 Katharine Livingston died on 1 February 1933 in Abingdon, Berkshire, at the age of 59.1

Children of Katharine Livingston and Capt. Lawrence Timpson

Citations

  1. [S81] Burke, Landed Gentry, p. 2793.
  2. [S81] Burke, Landed Gentry, p. 2792.

Katherine Livingston1

F
     Katherine Livingston was the daughter of Master Alexander Livingston and Barbara Livingston.1

Citations

  1. [S26] Hector Livingston Duff, Sewells in the New World, p. 114.

Laura Suffern Livingston1

F
     Laura Suffern Livingston was the daughter of Robert Reginald Livingston and Mary Tailer.1 Laura Suffern Livingston married Howland Shippen Davis, son of Howland Davis and Anna Shippen, on 6 September 1914 in New York ?2,3

Citations

  1. [S80] Arthur Meredyth Burke, Prominent Families, Livingston.
  2. [S81] Burke, Landed Gentry, p. 2793.
  3. [S131] George Norbury MacKenzie, Colonial families of the United States, Vol. VI p. 339.

Lewis L. Livingston1

M, b. 15 March 1814, d. 14 April 1886
     Lewis L. Livingston was born on 15 March 1814.1 He was the son of Judge Maturin Livingston and Margaret Lewis.1 Lewis L. Livingston died on 14 April 1886 at the age of 72.1

Citations

  1. [S167] William S. Pelletreau, Wills of the Smith families, p. 127.

Livingston Livingston1

M, b. 1809, d. 1872
     Livingston Livingston was born in 1809.1 He was the son of Philip Henry Livingston and Maria Livingston.1 He was a Attorney-at-Law.1 Livingston Livingston married Mary Cecelia Williamson, daughter of William Durkee Williamson, in 1859.1 Livingston Livingston died in 1872.1

Child of Livingston Livingston and Mary Cecelia Williamson

Citations

  1. [S81] Burke, Landed Gentry, p. 2793.

Louisa Livingston1

F, b. 5 May 1826, d. 13 April 1876
     Louisa Livingston was born on 5 May 1826.2 She was the daughter of James Duane Livingston and Sarah Swift.1 Louisa Livingston married Oliver Hewlett Jones, son of William H. Jones, on 30 March 1848.3 Louisa Livingston died on 13 April 1876 at the age of 49.2

Children of Louisa Livingston and Oliver Hewlett Jones

Citations

  1. [S250] Saint Nicholas Society, Vol. 1. p 88.
  2. [S575] John H. Jones, The Jones family of Long Island, p.166.
  3. [S575] John H. Jones, The Jones family of Long Island, p.165.

Margaret Livingston1

F, b. 4 July 1738, d. 31 July 1809
     Margaret Livingston was born on 4 July 1738.1 She was the daughter of James Livingston and Maria Kierstede.1 Margaret Livingston married Peter Robert Livingston, son of Robert Livingston, Jr. "Third Lord of the Manor" and Maria Thong, on 6 June 1758. Margaret Livingston died on 31 July 1809 at the age of 71.1

Children of Margaret Livingston and Peter Robert Livingston

Citations

  1. [S40] Unknown compiler, "The Honourable William Smith 1728-1793", Ancestral File, p.9 chart.

Margaret Livingston1

F, b. 5 November 1681, d. June 1758
     Margaret Livingston was born on 5 November 1681.2 She was the daughter of Hon. Robert Livingston, "First Lord of the Manor" and Alida Schuyler.1 Margaret Livingston married Colonel Samuel Vetch, son of William Veitch and Marion Fairley, on 20 December 1700.2 Margaret Livingston died in June 1758 at the age of 76.3

Children of Margaret Livingston and Colonel Samuel Vetch

Citations

  1. [S44] George Dangerfield, Chancellor Livingston, Chart.
  2. [S80] Arthur Meredyth Burke, Prominent Families, Livingston.
  3. [S131] George Norbury MacKenzie, Colonial families of the United States, Vol. VI p. 334.
  4. [S58] Various Editors, Dictionary of Canadian Biography, vol. II p. 652.

Margaret Livingston

F, b. 3 June 1768, d. 21 January 1802
     Margaret Livingston was born on 3 June 1768. She was the daughter of Peter Robert Livingston and Margaret Livingston. Margaret Livingston died on 21 January 1802 at the age of 33.

Margaret Livingston1

F, b. 6 January 1749, d. 19 March 1823
     Margaret Livingston was born on 6 January 1749.2 She was the daughter of Judge Robert Robert Livingston and Margaret Beekman.1 Margaret Livingston married Thomas T. Tillotson on 22 February 1779 four children.3,4 Margaret Livingston died on 19 March 1823 in Rhinebeck, New York, at the age of 74.4

Child of Margaret Livingston and Thomas T. Tillotson

Citations

  1. [S18] Various editors, Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans.
  2. [S80] Arthur Meredyth Burke, Prominent Families, Livingston.
  3. [S44] George Dangerfield, Chancellor Livingston, chart.
  4. [S131] George Norbury MacKenzie, Colonial families of the United States, Vol. VI p. 335.

Margaret Livingston1

F, b. 17 August 1808, d. 28 April 1874
     Margaret Livingston was born on 17 August 1808.1 She was the daughter of Lt. Colonel Edward Philip Livingston and Elizabeth Stevens Livingston.1 Margaret Livingston married David Augustus Clarkson, son of Thomas Sheatfield Clarkson and Elizabeth Van Horne, on 4 October 1827.1 Margaret Livingston died on 28 April 1874 at the age of 65 leaving issue.1

Citations

  1. [S80] Arthur Meredyth Burke, Prominent Families, Livingston.

Margaret Livingston1

F
     Margaret Livingston was the daughter of John Livingston.2 Margaret Livingston married Robert Thong Livingston, son of Peter Robert Livingston and Margaret Livingston, on 15 November 1787.1

Citations

  1. [S81] Burke, Landed Gentry, p. 2793.
  2. [S81] Burke, Landed Gentry, p. 2792.

Margaret Livingston1

F, b. 25 October 1747, d. 17 January 1830
     Margaret Livingston was baptised on 25 October 1747 at New York.2 She was the daughter of Philip Livingston and Christina Ten Broeck.1 Margaret Livingston married Dr. Thomas Jones on 30 July 1776 in Kingston, New York.2 Margaret Livingston died on 17 January 1830 at the age of 82.1

Citations

  1. [S131] George Norbury MacKenzie, Colonial families of the United States, Vol. VI p. 337.
  2. [S480] Emma Ten Broek Runk, The Ten Broeck Genealogy, #225.

Margaret Livingston1

F, b. 23 June 1738, d. 8 January 1818
     Margaret Livingston was baptised on 23 June 1738 at Kingston, New York.2 She was the daughter of Gilbert Livingston and Cornelia Beekman.1 Margaret Livingston married Petrus Stuyvesant on 17 October 1764 in New York City.2 Margaret Livingston died on 8 January 1818 in New York City at the age of 79.2

Children of Margaret Livingston and Petrus Stuyvesant

Citations

  1. [S113] William Addams Reitwiesner, Bush ancestry.
  2. [S478] New York Genealogical and Biographical Society New York Genealogical Record, Vol. 43, p. 91.
  3. [S478] New York Genealogical and Biographical Society New York Genealogical Record, Vol. 43, p. 92.
  4. [S250] Saint Nicholas Society, Vol. 1. p 154.
  5. [S250] Saint Nicholas Society, Vol. 1. p 155.